Home » React London Meetup August 2015, Viktor Charypar, GraphQL at The Financial Times financial times

React London Meetup August 2015, Viktor Charypar, GraphQL at The Financial Times financial times

by myyachtguardian123



Recently released by Facebook, GraphQL isn’t only useful for client-server communication. Viktor will show how Red Badger used the reference implementation – graphql-js – at the Financial Times as a generic data presentation layer over a set of backend APIs and how to deal with related requirements like caching or authorisation. .

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React London Meetup August 2015, Viktor Charypar, GraphQL at The Financial Times

React London Meetup August 2015, Viktor Charypar, GraphQL at The Financial Times

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React London Meetup August 2015, Viktor Charypar, GraphQL at The Financial Times
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2 comments

Nelson Correia 14/09/2021 - 2:46 Sáng

Great talk @Viktor.
We are using GraphQL for our little e-commerce project because the company CTO was inspired by the work done at the FT. (hats off)
It's worth taking note of one of the questions at the end:
27:45 – "the cost is still there in time even if it's in the backend" … "you will feel that slow-down when you start doing many nested requests or complex queries, that will happen". 🙁

it's worth understanding the downside of using GraphQL to "resolve" your backend queries,
you are effectively saying: find all the things required to satisfy this query, and only respond to
the client once they have all returned. This works well when you are only accessing internal
APIs but if you are consuming something external your app will always be waiting for the
slowest query to respond before replying to the client. Yes, you could make the same
"mistake" in your RESTful design, except in a RESTful API you could issue a series of queries
from your front-end and the first to respond to the client will render some content.
i.e. not have to wait for the slowest to respond.

The trick is to be smart about both how you construct your GraphQL queries and how you resolve them…
But this is not clear from any of the docs or how-to's up-front. Its all rainbows and butterflies…
I'd love to watch the talk by someone who is not a fan-boy (not saying Viktor is…)
but, is there anyone who is willing to stand up/out and say:
"GraphQL made our API slower and more complex so we dropped it…" ??
Or is it just too new for people to have found its pitfalls?
Obviously nobody at Facebook will ever say anything bad about their stack…

On the whole I'm still pretty excited about GraphQL but its essential to note that the "detail" is very much left to the reader.

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James Burnett 14/09/2021 - 2:46 Sáng

What is the chrome extension you are using to run the queries? It looks a bit like Advanced REST client, but I'm fairly sure it is not.

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